Profile

  • Title:
    Associate Professor and Director, Criminal Justice
  • Department:
    History, Political Science, and Criminal Justice

Eric Gentes, J.D.

Contact

Background

Attorney Eric Gentes spent five years in the private sector as a litigation attorney, and five years as an assistant county attorney (prosecutor) in New Hampshire before joining the Rivier faculty. He teaches courses in criminal law and criminal procedure, and about the criminal justice system. He also oversees the Criminal Justice Program’s three internship programs.

Degrees

  • J.D., Boston College Law School
  • B.A., University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Specialties

  • Criminal Law
  • Criminal Procedure
  • Litigation

Courses Taught

  • CJ 160 Introduction to Criminal Justice
  • CJ 200 Legal Writing & Research
  • CJ 214 Internship/Seminar I
  • CJ 220 Criminal Law & Procedure
  • CJ 230 International Human Rights
  • CJ 326 Juvenile Justice
  • CJ 330 Corrections & Community Supervision
  • CJ 341 JYS, Innocence & Guilt
  • CJ 350 Organized & Transnational Crime
  • CJ 395 Internship/Practicum
  • CJ 220 Criminal Law & Procedure
  • PSY 230 Forensic Psychology

Recent Publications and Proceedings

  1. Eric A. Gentes, From Strickland v. Washington to Garza v. Idaho: The Supreme Court’s Ever Increasingly Complex “Two-Prong” Test for Relief in Ineffective Assistance of Counsel Cases, 55 CRIM. L. BULLETIN 6 (2019).
  2. Eric A. Gentes, J.D., Warren Court, in the online ENCYCLOPEDIA OF JUVENILE DELIQUENCYAND JUSTICE, (Christopher J. Schreck ed., Wiley-Blackwell) (2017).
  3. Eric A. Gentes, J.D., Habeas Corpus, in the online ENCYCLOPEDIA OF JUVENILE DELIQUENCYAND JUSTICE, (Christopher J. Schreck ed., Wiley-Blackwell) (2017).
  4. Eric A. Gentes, J.D., Moving Toward Incorporating Relative Crime Severity into the Supreme Court’s Fourth Amendment Jurisprudence, 52 CRIM. L. BULLETIN 5 (2016).
  5. “Due Process.” Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell. 2014.
  6. “The Fifth Amendment to the United States Constitution.” Encyclopedia of Criminology and Criminal Justice. New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell. 2014.
  7. Moving Toward Incorporating Relative Crime Severity into Fourth Amendment Jurisprudence. Annual meeting of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS), Orlando, FL (2015) and Annual Meeting of the Northeastern Association of Criminal Justice Sciences (NEACJS), Roger Williams University, Bristol RI (2014).
  8. When is Remaining Silent not Protected by the Right to Remain Silent? Annual Meeting of the NEACJS, Roger Williams University, Bristol RI (2014).
  9. Implications of United States v. Jones One Year Later. Annual meeting of the ACJS, Dallas, TX (2013).
  10. Implications of Missouri v. Frye and Lafler v. Cooper One Year Later. Annual meeting of the ACJS, Dallas, TX (2013).