Department of Psychology

Dr. Elizabeth A. Harwood

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Department Coordinator
  • Ph.D., University of Montana
  • M.A., University of Montana
  • B.A., Middlebury College

Specialties

  • Best Practices in Teaching
  • Attachment
  • Cognitive Personality factors
  • Depression
  • Relationship Conflict and Satisfaction
  • Body Dissatisfaction
  • Substance Abuse

Background

Dr. Elizabeth Harwood received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Montana and completed her pre-doctoral internship at the University of New Hampshire’s Counseling Center. She joined Rivier University in 2009 and is the Department Coordinator for Psychology.

Dr. Harwood applies Carl Rogers’ core conditions for a positive therapeutic relationship, which include empathy, unconditional positive regard, and congruence, to her interactions with students and colleagues. Her love of teaching has inspired both her recent research and her involvement in the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (Division 2 of APA). Dr. Harwood has also contributed to her community’s efforts to combat the opioid crisis by speaking on the biological basis of addiction at community events and by helping create the Substance Use Disorder (SUD) track in Psychology and Human Services. In 2016, she received the NH Excellence in Education award for Outstanding Teaching in Post-secondary Education.

Academic Philosophy

“Carl Rogers’ core conditions for a positive therapeutic relationship include empathy, unconditional positive regard, and congruence, all of which are instrumental in my relationships with students and colleagues. First, by placing myself in my students’ shoes (empathy), I better understand where they are as learners in order to scaffold their skill sets to reach my high expectations. Whether conquering their fear of statistics, leading them through the complex process of writing a research paper, or giving them advice on their careers, I can’t help my students effectively unless I take the time to understand their needs. Second, I demonstrate unconditional positive regard for my students and colleagues, which involves accepting and respecting them for who they are and the strengths they bring to the table. Third, I firmly believe that being congruent, or in other words, being my true, genuine self, leads to a stronger rapport with my students and colleagues than separating myself as the “sage on the stage.” Sharing my enthusiasm with my students about teaching and taking risks by trying new activities, examples or teaching techniques that I think will “click” with my current class (because each class of students is different) reaps innumerable rewards. Keeping my teaching “fresh” by attending conferences and presenting my own techniques not only benefits students but also re-invigorates my own desire to be a life-long learner. Assessment, both formative and summative, is critical to the success of any class. Applying information in creative ways such as creating a drug prevention poster or writing one’s own theory of counseling is more important than regurgitating facts. Thinking critically and judicially and considering the ethical implications of one’s decisions are the broader goals of my courses as is fostering student excitement about the field. All of this can lead to a deeper involvement in the field, such as collaborating on research projects, presentations at conferences, student clubs, volunteering and other real-life experiences that prepare them for the workforce. My assessment methods include the level and quality of their class participation, exams, journals, applied projects, integrative papers, and portfolios. I also ask students to evaluate my class throughout the semester, both formally and informally. When I implement a new technique, I assess it through rigorous research design or simply by asking what my students think at the end of a class. I truly love and value my roles in and out of the classroom. My career in higher education has been intellectually and emotionally fulfilling. Making a difference in an emerging adult’s life when they are forming their identities and discovering their life goals is such a rewarding experience as is helping non-traditional students fulfill their dreams of a higher education. I truly believe that if you demonstrate unconditional positive regard, congruence, and empathy, set your expectations high, and inspire students’ innate desire to learn, they will meet your challenges and emerge as life-long learners.”

Recent Publications and Proceedings

  • Harwood, E.A. (January 2019). The Science behind Substance Use Disorder. Keynote presented at the CAST Town Hall, Milford, NH.
  • Bruzios, K., & Harwood, E. (in press). Response styles, issues of. In B. J. Carducci (Editor-in-Chief & Vol Ed.), Wiley-Blackwell encyclopedia of personality and individual differences: Vol. II. Research methods and assessment techniques. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Friedman, L., & Harwood, E. (in press). Cognitive Behavioral and Cognitive Self-Report Assessment Techniques. In B. J. Carducci (Editor-in-Chief & Vol Ed.), Wiley-Blackwell encyclopedia of personality and individual differences: Vol. II. Research methods and assessment techniques. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Shevenell, M., & Harwood, E. (in press). Masculinity-Femininity, assessment of. In B. J. Carducci (Editor-in-Chief & Vol Ed.), Wiley-Blackwell encyclopedia of personality and individual differences: Vol. II. Research methods and assessment techniques. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
  • Harwood, E. & Marsano, M. (accepted for publication, 2018). Building Note-taking Skills in the Millennial Student: Scaffolding Frameworks of Knowledge. In W. Altman, L. Stein, & J. E. Westfall (Eds.), Essays from E-xcellence in Teaching.
  • Harwood, E.A., Meteyer, K., Smith, R., & Kheran, G. (August 2018). An Introductory Psychology Teaching Slam: Encouraging Engagement with Activities and Assignments. Workshop presented at the American Psychological Association's Annual Convention, San Francisco, CA.
  • Harwood, E.A., & Marsano, M. (August 2018). Strategies for Scaffolding Knowledge in the Millennial Student. Workshop presented at the American Psychological Association's Annual Convention, San Francisco, CA.
  • Sacco, N., & Harwood, E.A. (2018, March). Workforce development in healthcare. Workshop presented at Leadership of Greater Nashua, Nashua, NH.
  • Marra, M. & Harwood, E.A. (2017, October). Defining the stigma of mental illness considering the current opioid epidemic. Paper accepted for the New England Psychological Association’s annual conference, Boston, MA.
  • 2016 New Hampshire Excellence in Education Award recipient. Award presented by the NH College & University Council.

Courses Taught

  • PSY 101 General Psychology
  • PSY 205 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences with Lab
  • PSY 250 Psychological Disorders
  • PSY 206 Experimental Psychology
  • PSY 301 Drugs and Behavior
  • PSY 313 Contemporary Controversies in Psychology
  • PSY 401 Psychological Testing and Assessment
  • PSY 402 Counseling Theories and Practice
  • PSY 403 Clinical Psychology
  • PSY 408 Coordinating Seminar
  • ED 614 Clinical Counseling Theories
  • ED 804 Social Bases of Behavior
  • ED 806 Seminar: Psychopathology and Interventions
  • ED 809 Psychometrics
  • ED 881 Quantitative Analysis in Psychology