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Previous Lecture Series (with materials)

  • Rivier College Mathematics and Computer Science Lecture Series

    "Software Reliability Methods and Experience" Review of the October 20-21 MIT Autonomous Sensing Conference

    Presented by David J. Dwyer

     

    David J. Dwyer is a reliability engineer at BAE Systems, Nashua, NH. He has a M.S. in Computer Science from Rivier College (1999), M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University (1980), and B.S. in Physics from Providence College (1963).

     
    The presentation will address methodology in estimating and projecting software reliability. It will help academic audience to find answers to vital questions: How reliable are industrial software products? Can software reliability be measured exactly? New methods are offered for estimating the test time required and software failures to be corrected to reach reliability goals of the test-and-fix programs.
  • Rivier College Mathematics and Computer Science Lecture Series

    David J. Dwyer presents "New Methods of Software Reliability: Estimations and Projections"

    David J. Dwyer is a reliability engineer at BAE Systems, Nashua, NH. He has a M.S. in Computer Science from Rivier College (1999), M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University (1980), and B.S. in Physics from Providence College (1963).

    The presentation will address methodology in estimating and projecting software reliability. It will help academic audience to find answers to vital questions: How reliable are industrial software products? Can software reliability be measured exactly? New methods are offered for estimating the test time required and software failures to be corrected to reach reliability goals of the test-and-fix programs.

    The presented article will be published in the Second Issue of the Rivier College Online Academic Journal in April 2006.
     

  • Bryan Higgs presents Cryptography Through the Ages: A Layman's View
    Humanities Series

    Professor Higgs developed a course on Computer Security, and became fascinated by the rich and colorful history of the science and art of cryptography -- the creation and transfer of secret messages.  This was surprising, because he never considered himself either a historian, or even a student of history.  What appealed to him was the diversity of the subject: how many significant historical events were impacted by cryptography, and the amazing number of interesting people who were influential in this history.  You might be surprised at the number of these people you are already familiar with from your own knowledge of history, or from other disciplines.  The history of cryptography starts in ancient Egypt, progresses through Greek and Roman wars, European city and nation states, Mary Queen of Scots, two world wars, the establishment of the National Security Agency, and the cold war.  It culminates in Quantum Cryptography, which is based on the Quantum Theory and the theoretical possibility of Quantum Computers, and promises theoretically unbreakable ciphers.  The focus of this presentation will be on the historical events, and the people involved, including their motivations, and the consequences of their actions; no knowledge of computers or mathematics will be presumed.

 

Dr. Vladimir Riabov is an Associate Professor at the Department of Mathematics & Computer Science in Rivier College. He specializes in networking technologies, object-oriented system analysis and design, aeronautics, and system simulation and modeling. He received a Ph.D. in Mathematics and Physics from Moscow Institute of Physics & Technology (1979) and a Master of Science in Computer Information Systems from Southern New Hampshire University (1998).

The presentation reviews the results of systematic studies of modern networking-systems software. It is shown that the number of unreliable complex code functional modules correlates with the number of customer requests, error-fixing submits, and the possible errors, which have been estimated with McCabe and Halstead metrics. It has been found that the major reduction of the code complexity (based on the mathematical theory of graphs) leads to significant reduction of errors and maintainability efforts. Test planning and code coverage issues for embedded networking systems are considered as well. 

 

The presentation addresses methodology in estimating and projecting software reliability. It will help  academic audience to find answers to vital questions: How reliable are industrial software products? Can software reliability be measured exactly? New methods are offered for estimating the test time required and software failures to be corrected to reach reliability goals of the test-and-fix programs.  

David J. Dwyer is a reliability engineer at BAE Systems, Nashua, NH. He has a M.S. in Computer Science from Rivier College (1999), M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University (1980), and B.S. in Physics from Providence College (1963).