Mathematics & Computer Science Department
Rivier College
420 Main Street  Nashua, NH
 

 

 

Home
Tutoring
Internship
Software Catalog
Lecture Series

 

 

Lecture Series      

horizontal rule

bullet

Rivier College Mathematics and Computer Science Lecture Series

"Software Reliability Methods and Experience" Review of the October 20-21 MIT Autonomous Sensing Conference

Presented by David J. Dwyer

 

Thursday, November 1, 2007

7:45 pm - 8:45 pm
Education Building Auditorium, EDU 305,

 

David J. Dwyer is a reliability engineer at BAE Systems, Nashua, NH. He has a M.S. in Computer Science from Rivier College (1999), M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University (1980), and B.S. in Physics from Providence College (1963).

 
The presentation will address methodology in estimating and projecting software reliability. It will help academic audience to find answers to vital questions: How reliable are industrial software products? Can software reliability be measured exactly? New methods are offered for estimating the test time required and software failures to be corrected to reach reliability goals of the test-and-fix programs.

horizontal rule

Previous Lecture Series

 

bullet

Professional Seminar in Computer Science
Math and Computer Science Lecture Series

April 26, 2007
7:45 pm - 9:45 pm
Education Building Auditorium EDU 305

Keith Fryklund presented “Nashua Soup Kitchen Database Management System”

Anchal Gupta presented “Motel Reservation System”

Jason Bessette presented “Jack The Ripper: A Web Content Downloader”

Shalini Joginpalli presented “Blade Servers

Bruce Trull presented “Technique for Infiniband™ Dynamic Memory Registration”

Vandana Wekhande presented Ajax: A new approach to Web Application

Keith Fryklund, Anchal Gupta, Jason Bessette, Shalini Joginpalli, Bruce Trull, and Vandana Wekhande,Rivier College students, presented their final projects in the Computer Science programs.

Keith Fryklund will graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from Rivier College in May2007; Anchal Gupta will graduate with a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science in December 2007;
 

Jason Bessette and Vandana Wekhande will graduate with a Master of Science in Computer Science in May 2007;

Shalini Joginpalli and Bruce Trull will graduate with a Master of Science in Computer

Science in December 2007.

     
bullet

Professional Seminar in Computer Science
Math and Computer Science Lecture Series

Arlene Kearns
presented “Network Monitor”
Ajay Kumar
presented “Windows Covering System with Oracle Database Server

April 19, 2007
7:45 pm - 9:45 pm
Education Building Auditorium EDU 305

Arlene Kearns and Ajay Kumar, graduate students, presented their final projects in the Computer
Science program. They will graduate with a Master of Science in Computer Science from Rivier College
in May 2007
 

bullet Rivier College Mathematics and Computer Science Lecture Series

David J. Dwyer presents "New Methods of Software Reliability: Estimations and Projections"

Thursday, March 23, 2006
Education Building Auditorium EDU 305, 7:45-8:45 p.m.

David J. Dwyer is a reliability engineer at BAE Systems, Nashua, NH. He has a M.S. in Computer Science from Rivier College (1999), M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University (1980), and B.S. in Physics from Providence College (1963).

The presentation will address methodology in estimating and projecting software reliability. It will help academic audience to find answers to vital questions: How reliable are industrial software products? Can software reliability be measured exactly? New methods are offered for estimating the test time required and software failures to be corrected to reach reliability goals of the test-and-fix programs.

The presented article will be published in the Second Issue of the Rivier College Online Academic Journal in April 2006.
 

bulletProfessional Seminar in Computer Science
Math and Computer Science Lecture Series

Todd Lougee presents "Web Applications Explained: SWAT Case Study"
David Snogles presents "Personal Encrypted Talk Tool"

Tuesday, May 3
7:45 p.m. - 9:45 p.m.
EDU 305

Todd Lougee and David Snogles, graduate students, present their final projects in the Computer Science program. They will graduate with a Master of Science in Computer Science from Rivier College in May 2005.

 

bulletProfessional Seminar in Computer Science
Math and Computer Science Lecture Series

Martin Milkovits presents "Modeling and Modeling a Digital Video Cluster"
Sivaramkumar Yerramsetty presents "Visual Data Structures"
Wenling Zhao presents "Creating a Content Management System"
Xiaoling Zhu presents "A New Chat System"

Tuesday, April 26, 2005
7:45 p.m. - 9:45 p.m.
EDU 305

Martin Milkovits, Sivaramkumar Yerramsetty, Wenling Zhao, and Xiaoling Zhu, graduate students, present their final projects in the Computer Science program. They will graduate with a Master of Science in Computer Science from Rivier College in May 2005.
 
bulletBryan Higgs presents Cryptography Through the Ages: A Layman's View
Humanities Series

Monday, April 25, 2005
12:30PM
Reception Room of the Dion Center.

Professor Higgs recently developed a course on Computer Security, and became fascinated by the rich and colorful history of the science and art of cryptography -- the creation and transfer of secret messages.  This was surprising, because he never considered himself either a historian, or even a student of history.  What appealed to him was the diversity of the subject: how many significant historical events were impacted by cryptography, and the amazing number of interesting people who were influential in this history.  You might be surprised at the number of these people you are already familiar with from your own knowledge of history, or from other disciplines.  The history of cryptography starts in ancient Egypt, progresses through Greek and Roman wars, European city and nation states, Mary Queen of Scots, two world wars, the establishment of the National Security Agency, and the cold war.  It culminates in Quantum Cryptography, which is based on the Quantum Theory and the theoretical possibility of Quantum Computers, and promises theoretically unbreakable ciphers.  The focus of this presentation will be on the historical events, and the people involved, including their motivations, and the consequences of their actions; no knowledge of computers or mathematics will be presumed.

Dr. Bryan Higgs is Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Rivier College, and teaches a number of courses, including Database Systems, Web Development, and Programming in Java, C++, and Perl.  He has recently developed a course in Computer Security, and in that course has implemented a number of Java programs to illustrate the concepts of Cryptography and some of the underlying mathematical principles behind modern cryptography, plus discussions of a number of other security areas, including viruses, worms, and browser security.

 

bulletProfessional Seminar in Computer Science
Math and Computer Science Lecture Series

Gregory Dake presents "A Public Resource Computing Platform for Simulating N-Body Galaxies"
Peter Gao presents "eBay Sales System"
Anjana Nekkanti presents "Library Management Server"

Tuesday, April 19
7:45 p.m. - 9:45 p.m.
EDU 305

Gregory Dake, Peter Gao, and Anjana Nekkanti, graduate students, present their final projects in the Computer Science program. They will graduate with a Master of Science in Computer Science from Rivier College in May 2005.

 

bulletVladimir Riabov presents "Networking Systems Code Studies with Structured Testing Methodology",
Math and Computer Science Lecture Series
Tuesday, April 19, 2005
6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.
EDU 305

Dr. Vladimir Riabov is an Associate Professor at the Department of Mathematics & Computer Science in Rivier College. He specializes in networking technologies, object-oriented system analysis and design, aeronautics, and system simulation and modeling. He received a Ph.D. in Mathematics and Physics from Moscow Institute of Physics & Technology (1979) and a Master of Science in Computer Information Systems from Southern New Hampshire University (1998).

The presentation reviews the results of systematic studies of modern networking-systems software. It is shown that the number of unreliable complex code functional modules correlates with the number of customer requests, error-fixing submits, and the possible errors, which have been estimated with McCabe and Halstead metrics. It has been found that the major reduction of the code complexity (based on the mathematical theory of graphs) leads to significant reduction of errors and maintainability efforts. Test planning and code coverage issues for embedded networking systems are considered as well. 

 

 
bulletDavid D. Norman presents "Software Systems Engineering - Education and Practice"
Math and Computer Science Lecture Series

Tuesday, November 11, 2003
7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
MEM 102

David D. Norman is a Principle Software Engineer at IMPACT Science and Technology, Inc. in Hollis, NH. He specializes in Object-Oriented Analysis and Design of real-time software systems. He will graduate with a Master of Science in Computer Science from Rivier College in Spring of 2004.

The presentation addresses the following Software Systems Engineering issues based upon the author's experience in both college and industry: defining the problem, designing a solution, testing the solution to ensure it meets the requirements, proper documentation, and support after product delivery. It will help academic audience find answers to a vital question: How these aspects are important for a young software engineer to practice modern good engineering? The author will discuss how courses he has taken at River College have addressed the need for instruction in the new complex areas of software engineering and how they have been applied on a specific project for his company.

 

New Methods of Software Reliability: Estimations and Projections, David J. Dwyer, October 29, 2002
Math and Computer Science Lecture Series

The presentation addresses methodology in estimating and projecting software reliability. It will help  academic audience to find answers to vital questions: How reliable are industrial software products? Can software reliability be measured exactly? New methods are offered for estimating the test time required and software failures to be corrected to reach reliability goals of the test-and-fix programs.  

David J. Dwyer is a reliability engineer at BAE Systems, Nashua, NH. He has a M.S. in Computer Science from Rivier College (1999), M.S. in Electrical Engineering from Northeastern University (1980), and B.S. in Physics from Providence College (1963).

Lecture time and location :  7:45-8:45pm, Tuesday, October 29, 2002
                                         Sylvia Trottier hall Auditorium STH235

horizontal rule

sciences@rivier.edu

Last date page was modified: November 12, 2007